Open In App

No Regrets

When someone calls us out on bad behavior, our instinct is to meet the sting of the truth with denial and anger. It is far easier to get angry at the messenger than to self-reflect and feel the uncomfortable ache of truth being spoken into our lives.

Paul wrote a frank letter to the church in Corinth, causing them sorrow and hurt. It would have been easy for the believers in Corinth to be defensive, dwell on the hurt and respond to Paul with anger and indignation. Contrary to instinct, Paul notes the response of the Christians in Corinth: “I see that my letter hurt you, but only for a little while — yet now I am happy … because your sorrow led you to repentance” (2 Corinthians 7:8-9).

The church did not respond as the world would respond, but as Jesus calls us to respond. They accepted the feedback, repented, used it to grow spiritually and set an example along the way for others. We are still reading about the example set and learning from it. “Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation and leaves no regret, but worldly sorrow brings death” (2 Corinthians 7:10).


  • When was the last time someone corrected you? How did you respond?
  • Why is correction good for us?
  • What do you need to change about the way you respond to correction?

Like what you just read? Download the NewSpring App for an even better reading experience. You can read, share, and bookmark your favorites quickly and easily from your phone.

We want you to have a safe experience while using our site.

Unfortunately, there are security risks associated with your browser. To keep you protected we will be discontinuing support to this browser. Please visit for a secure browser update.